Ensure that your company’s policies and training emphasize the importance of equal treatment for families with children. Here are some tips to help your employees avoid making comments that express a preference against residents with children. 

Think carefully about the questions you ask prospective residents.

It is okay to ask about the number of people who will live in the apartment home, but avoid questions specifically relating to children. For example, don’t say, “How many adults and children will be residing in your apartment home?” Instead say, “How many people will be residing in your apartment home?”

Be careful when talking about facilities or services.

Don’t post a sign that says, “Children may not skateboard on community property.” Instead say, “Skateboarding is prohibited on community property.” You may require direct adult supervision when children use community services and facilities. However, the rules must not unreasonably restrict a child from using the amenities. So, don’t say, “Children under the age of 14 are prohibited.”  Instead say, “Persons under the age of 14 must be accompanied by an adult.”

Consider your advertising language carefully.

It is illegal to create, publish or distribute housing ads that discriminate, limit, or deny equal access to housing because of membership in any of the federally protected classes. When describing housing in an advertisement, do not include any limitations based on familial status, such as “no children allowed”, “couples preferred”, or “singles-friendly”.

Don’t Make Assumptions.

Do not make assumptions about what an individual may or may not be interested in viewing. Offer options and solutions, but let the prospect make the final decision. Letting prospects make the decision avoids the illegal practice of steering. For example, if you’re touring a mother of young children and only tell her about first-floor apartments because you assume she wants to avoid the stairs, this could be construed as steering.